Short-Term Optimism, Longer-Term Caution

profit-loss-riskMy Comments: You by now know that I’m expecting a signficant market correction in the near future. However, when I say that, one has to wonder what I mean by “near”. An analogy I sometimes use is a comment by a currency trader I knew years ago. His idea of “near” was in the next 24 hours; for him a long term hold has 3 or 4 days.

U.S. stocks will likely move higher as pension fund managers go bargain hunting in an effort to put seasonal cash inflows to work.

October 23, 2014 Commentary by Scott Minerd, Chairman of Investments and Global Chief Investment Officer, Guggenheim Investments

Last week’s investment roller coaster was something we had been expecting—U.S. stocks delivered their usual bout of seasonal volatility right on cue. For now, recent spread widening in high-yield bonds and leveraged bank loans seems to be over, and it also appears that equities have regained their footing after a turbulent week.

With the anticipated seasonal pattern of higher volatility in September and October now largely fulfilled, we anticipate more positive seasonal factors over the next two months. Over the last 68 years, the S&P 500 has averaged monthly gains of 0.9 percent in October, followed by even stronger increases of 1.2 percent in November and 1.8 percent in December.

The current dark cloud that hangs over Europe is a serious threat and something that investors should closely monitor. If the anticipated seasonal strength—which is typically driven by an influx of cash into pension funds that their managers are keen to put to work—is not forthcoming, investors should seriously question how much further the current bull market can run. As of now, we remain cautiously optimistic as we await some crucial economic data.

Economic Data Releases / U.S. Housing Market Data Is Solid

  • Existing home sales rose 2.4 percent in September to an annualized rate of 5.17 million homes, the highest in one year.
  • Housing starts rose 6.3 percent in September to an annualized pace of 1.02 million.
  • Most of the gains were driven by a 16.7 percent jump in multi-family starts.
  • Building permits increased by a modest 1.5 percent to 1.02 million in September.
  • The FHFA house price index rose a better-than-expected 0.5 percent in August, a five-month high.
  • University of Michigan Consumer Confidence rose to 86.4 from 84.6 in the initial October reading. The reading was the highest in seven years and was driven by better consumer expectations.
  • Initial jobless claims rose off a multi-year low for the week ending Oct. 18, increasing to 283,000, the fourth lowest reading this year.
  • The Leading Economic Index expanded by 0.8 percent in September. Nine of 10 indicators were positive.
  • The Consumer Price Index was unchanged on a year-over-year basis at 1.7 percent in September. The core CPI also remained at 1.7 percent. Falling energy prices were offset by higher food and shelter costs.
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