Disruption Of Confidence

Monday = Investing Money:

I’d like to think that my posts help someone, anyone? Professionally I’ve lived in the financial world for over 40 years and it pains me to say I haven’t a clue what’s going to happen next. What’s telling is that others, far more competent than I, don’t have a clue either.

Lance Roberts, whose comments I share this week, is a technician, attempting to glean clues from a rigorous adherence to mathematics and the signals that supposedly exist and reveal the future when correctly interpreted. Tread carefully.

Aug. 20, 2017 Lance Roberts Seeking Alpha

As noted last week:
“The weakness in the market previously, combined with the threats between the U.S. and North Korea, led to a fairly sharp unwinding in equities on Thursday which in turn triggered a short-term sell signal.

That sell-off has remained confined to the current bullish trend line but has threatened to violate the 50-dma (day/daily moving average). If the market is unable to regain the 50-dma on Monday, and remain above it for the balance of the coming week, the most likely move in the markets will be lower.”

I have updated the chart above (see HERE) through Friday afternoon. I followed that analysis up on Tuesday, stating:
“On Monday, the market surged out of the gate as headlines suggested ‘geopolitical risk’ had subsided. I find this particular explanation hard to digest, given the rising rhetoric of a potential trade war with China, violence in Charlottesville over the weekend, no resolution with North Korea, etc., so forth, and so on. I find little evidence of a global turn in geopolitical stresses currently.

Monday’s ‘buy the dip’ frenzy was no different. The question will be whether the market can both reverse the short-term ‘sell signal’ and climb above the previous resistance of the old highs? Such a reversal would end the current consolidation process and allow for additional capital to be invested.”

That was so last Tuesday…

The reversal, at least to this point, was not to be the case.

Exactly one week after last week’s sell-off, the market dumped again. This time it was the news of the complete dismemberment of President Trump’s “economic council” of CEOs along with the rumor that Gary Cohn would be exiting his position at the White House as well. While the latter turned out to be #FakeNews, the damage had already been done as market participants began to question the ability of the Administration to get its promised legislative action advanced.

Given the run-up in the markets since the election, which was based on tax cuts/reform, infrastructure spending, repatriation and repeal of the Affordable Care Act, the lack of progress on that agenda has left the markets pushing higher on “hope” and “promises.” The disbanding of the economic council has led to some disruption of that confidence.

Importantly, with the market currently on a weekly sell signal, it also compounded the bulls’ problems by breaking the bullish trend line that begins in February of last year.

This is not a “panic and sell everything” signal…yet.

It is, however, a potentially important change to the bullish backdrop of the market in the short-term particularly given the ongoing deterioration in the internal participation in the market. Note that when sell signals have been triggered from similarly high levels (vertical red dashed lines), subsequent corrections have been fairly brutal.

Previously, I questioned whether or not to “buy the dip?”

“My best guess currently is – probably. But not yet.”

I also stated the following two reasons for that sentiment:

1. Bull markets don’t typically end when the mainstream media is “peeing down both legs” over the 1.5% drop on Thursday.

2. The bullish uptrend remains intact and “fear” gauges remain confined to a downtrend.

This remains this week as well. The sell-off so far remains contained above the previous bullish breakout to new highs and remains above current price support levels. Furthermore, while volatility did pick up a bit on Thursday, it has not exceeded last week’s volatility spike, suggesting traders are less worried about a correction than media headlines makes it appear.

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