GOP Lawmaker Hopes To Halt Fiduciary Push

financial freedomMy Comment: This push by the GOP is, in my opinion, more smoke and mirrors from those beholden to the lobbyists from Wall Street. The crux of this issue is that the people who run Wall Street firms do not want their rank and file representatives, the ones who work with people like you and me on a daily basis, to be held to a fiduciary standard.

For those of you who may not understand, a fiduciary standard means that what is said and done by representatives has to be in all respects, in the best interest of those who are clients of those representatives. The push back has been going on for years, and here is another example of how monied interests are more concerned about the welfare of the monied interests than of the general public.

That it “harms thousands of low and middle income Americans’ ability to save and invest for their future” is absolute and utter bullshit. I’m someone who has worked and made a living for the past 40 years, helping low and middle income Americans save and invest for their financial future, not some politician, bought and paid for by Wall Street firms.

Feb 26, 2015 | By Melanie Waddell

Firing back after President Barack Obama endorsed the Department of Labor’s efforts to revise fiduciary rules for retirement plan advice, Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Mo., has reintroduced legislation to require the DOL to wait to repropose its rule until the Securities and Exchange Commission issues its own fiduciary rulemaking.

Wagner’s bill, H.R. 2374, the Retail Investor Protection Act, passed the House last year. But the Senate had “no interest” in taking up the bill and President Obama’s senior advisors threatened that it would be vetoed.

Better Markets and the Consumer Federation of America sent a letter to the full Senate the same day Wagner took action this week, arguing that the DOL rulemaking should be allowed to move forward as the “actual contents” of the DOL rule have not been made public.

Discussion about the DOL rulemaking “has for the most part been based on speculation,” Barbara Roper, director of investor protection for the Consumer Federation, and Dennis Kelleher, president and CEO of Better Markets, said in a letter.

“Much of (the discussion/complaints about the DOL redraft) has been directly contradicted by statements from DOL officials about its expected regulatory approach,” Roper and Kelleher wrote.

In a statement, Wagner said that she is reintroducing her bill because Obama and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., “presented a solution in search of a problem by proposing another massive rulemaking from Washington that will harm thousands of low- and middle-income Americans’ ability to save and invest for their future.”

“This top-down, Washington-centered rulemaking against financial advisors and broker-dealers will harm the very middle-income families that Senator Warren and President Obama claim to protect,” Wagner said. “Americans should be given more freedom to seek sound financial advice without Senator Warren and President Obama’s interference.”

Wagner’s bill says that the SEC would be required to “go first” in issuing its rulemaking under Section 913 of the Dodd Frank Act before the DOL is able to propose a rule that expands the definition of a fiduciary under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act.
But Roper and Kelleher told the Senate that the DOL rule should be “allowed to go forward, so that the public and all stakeholders have an equal opportunity to see the actual content of the rule.” Indeed, they wrote, “as required by law, at the close of the public comment period, DOL will consider all of the comments and input and decide the best course of action consistent with the law.”

By sending the rule to the Office of Management and Budget, DOL is simply starting the process to release the actual proposed rule for public comment, the two wrote.

The OMB review could take several months. Wagner’s bill would also require the SEC to “look into potential issues with a rulemaking establishing a uniform fiduciary standard in regards to investor harm and access to financial products that were not adequately addressed” in the agency’s 2011 study.

The SEC would also be asked under Wagner’s bill to look into “other alternatives outside of a uniform fiduciary standard which could help with issues of investor confusion.”

Wagner’s bill “is an investor protection bill in name only,” according to a statement from the Financial Planning Coalition, which comprises the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, the Financial Planning Association and the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors.

The coalition added that it “helped prevent this legislation from becoming law when it was first introduced and continues to oppose it now and in the future,” arguing that it would leave American investors “vulnerable to potential abuses and would substantially impede or even prevent the SEC from proceeding with congressionally authorized fiduciary rulemaking.”

Wagner’s legislation, the coalition stated, “would require the (Securities and Exchange) Commission to consider less adequate and less effective alternatives,” and would also “slow or effectively prohibit the DOL from proceeding with its proposed fiduciary rulemaking for financial professionals who provide investment advice to retirement savers.”

SEC Chairwoman Mary Jo White said last week that she would speak about her position regarding a rule to put brokers under a fiduciary mandate “in the short term,” noting that it remains her priority “to get the Commission in a position to make that decision” on such a rule.

Advertisements