Military Retirement Faces Shake-up

FT 11FEB13My Comments: I did not serve in the military; I failed my draft physical way back in 1959. They gave me a 1-Y classification that said ‘only in case of national emergency’. I don’t think I was upset since by then I was a freshman at the University of Florida and VietNam was looming on the horizon.

All the same, I’m sensitive to those who did, especially all the millions who served and survived and spent years in the effort. And as someone now of an age when retirement is normal and expected, making sure the benefits for those who worked long hours for all of us is financially secure is important.

Here’s a short glimpse into what is going on. As a financial planner of many years, this makes sense to me.

Jan 28, 2015 | By Marlene Y. Satter

A long-awaited report on the military’s compensation system will include proposals for sweeping changes in how retirement is approached, the Military Times reported Wednesday.

The newspaper, citing anonymous sources familiar with the report, said its provisions will include a phase-out of the current system, which allows service members to collect a benefit immediately upon retirement after 20 years.

A hybrid system is set to be proposed as a replacement, one which will incorporate a smaller defined benefit plan, lump-sum payments and more cash-based benefits.

In addition, the new system would incorporate a 401(k)-type investment account as a significant portion of a service member’s retirement benefit.

The new plan would automatically enroll service members in the government’s Thrift Savings Plan, with service members being responsible for managing their own accounts.

Money in the TSP is not accessible without penalty until the participant turns 59½. Troops would be required to serve a minimum period of time before they are eligible for full ownership of the account, and the government would likely contribute a percentage of basic pay that could vary based on years of service and deployment status.

In addition to the 401(k)-type benefit, there would also continue to be a DB component to the plan, but the coming proposal is expected to make it more modest than at present and restrict its availability until age 60 or perhaps even later.

Such proposed changes not only would have to be approved by Congress, but would affect only new recruits. Currently serving military personnel would be grandfathered into the existing system.

The Military Times said companion proposals to change the health benefits offered by the military are also expected, although they would likely affect troops presently serving — should such proposals manage to pass Congress.

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