Tag Archives: healthcare

Medicare Open Enrollment Runs from October 15th to December 7th

My Comments: Medicare is an absolutely critical component if you expect to have a joyful and happy retirement.

As someone who benefits monthly from it, I can attest to its value in contributing to my peace of mind.  Don’t vote for any politician who in any way threatens is viability.

Each year, there is an open enrollment period when you can get your name into the system if you are not already age 65, and if you are already signed in, evaluate some options that might benefit you.

This image is what appeared in my email inbox a few days ago. The links shown are not live; instead simply click on the image itself and you’ll find where you need to start.

Advertisements

Here’s what you need to know about Medicare if you’re still working

My Comments: Despite the appeal of retirement, no one is ready to admit that the transition from “working for money” to “money working for you” will be easy.

The cost of health care as you get older has the potential to cause your retirement plans to come unglued. To keep that from happening, Medicare is an enormous benefit, especially when coupled with what is known as a ‘medicare supplement’ insurance policy.

Many of us choose to keep working well beyond the age when we become eligible for Medicare and that alone presents some interesting challenges. Here’s a good summary of what you can expect if you are still employed.

by Joe Baker on 9/11/2018

If you’re 65 or older, working and have an employer group health plan based on your current work, you may have questions about how your job-based insurance coordinates with Medicare. On our Medicare Rights Center National Consumer Helpline, such questions are among the most frequent ones we get.

Here’s what you need to know:
For people who work and have job-based insurance, knowing when to enroll in Medicare falls on them. There is no formal notification from the Social Security Administration or Medicare. Some people are misinformed by employers or don’t have reliable information about Medicare enrollment, leading them to delay enrollment in Medicare Part B and then incur penalties and high medical costs.

The rules on coordinating Medicare and employer coverage

Having job-based insurance does allow you to delay Medicare enrollment without penalty and delay paying the Medicare Part B premium (the standard Medicare Part B premium is expected to be $134 a month in 2019). However, it’s important to know whether your job-based insurance will pay primary or secondary to Medicare.

In most cases, you should only delay enrollment in Medicare if your job-based insurance is the primary payer (meaning it pays first for your medical bills) and Medicare is secondary. There are additional enrollment considerations if you have a Health Savings Account (HSA); if you enroll in Medicare Part A and/or B, you can no longer contribute pretax dollars to your HSA.

Job-based insurance is primary if it is from an employer with 20 or more employees. Medicare is secondary in this case, and some people in this situation choose not to enroll in Medicare Part B so that they do not have to pay the monthly premium.

Job-based insurance is secondary if it is from an employer with fewer than 20 employees; Medicare is primary in this case. If you work at an employer this small and delay Medicare enrollment, your job-based insurance may provide little or no coverage. That’s why you should enroll in Medicare Part B to avoid incurring high costs for your care. The rules are different, however, if you are Medicare-eligible due to a disability or because you have End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD).

The Medicare special enrollment period

If you are eligible for Medicare because you are 65 or older and are covered by your job-based insurance or your spouse’s, you have a Special Enrollment Period (SEP) to enroll in Medicare Part B while you are covered by job-based insurance and up to eight months after you no longer have that coverage. This means you aren’t required to take Part B during your Initial Enrollment Period (IEP), or the seven months surrounding your 65th birthday, when you become Medicare eligible.

Using the Part B Special Enrollment Period means you will not have to pay a Part B late enrollment penalty (LEP). Normally, for every 12 months that people who are Medicare-eligible and not covered by employer insurance delay enrollment, they accrue a 10% penalty, which is then added to their monthly Part B premium amount. In most cases, the penalty lasts for as long as someone has Medicare.

Retiree coverage, COBRA, Affordable Care Act and Medicare

Many Medicare-eligible individuals do not know that employer-offered retiree coverage is almost always secondary to Medicare.

Similarly, health insurance coverage through COBRA (employer-sponsored coverage you can pay to keep after you leave your job, usually for up to 18 months) is also always secondary to Medicare coverage. If you have employer-offered retiree coverage or COBRA, you should enroll in Medicare when first eligible to avoid possible penalties, higher medical costs and gaps in coverage.

You should also make sure you understand how to make Medicare Part B enrollment decisions if you are enrolled in a Marketplace plan under the Affordable Care Act.
If you have an insurance plan certified by the Marketplace, known as a Qualified Health Plan, deciding what to do as you approach Medicare eligibility depends on your circumstances. If you delayed enrolling in Medicare so you could stay in your Marketplace plan, you may be eligible to request time-limited equitable relief. That will let you enroll in Medicare Part B without penalty or eliminate or reduce your late-enrollment penalty under certain circumstances. The opportunity to request time-limited equitable relief lasts until September 30, 2018.

For more information on how Medicare works with other types of health care coverage, visit Medicare Interactive, the Medicare Rights Center’s free, online resource packed with hundreds of answers to Medicare questions.

Joe Baker is president of the Medicare Rights Center, a national nonprofit consumer organization that works to ensure access to affordable health care for older adults and people with disabilities. He is also an adjunct professor at the New York University School of Law. Previously, he was deputy secretary for health and human services for New York state.

Click HERE to read the source article

How to pay for long-term care? Several funding options exist

My Comments: If you don’t think about it, maybe it’ll go away. But for millions of us, living longer than our parents, LTC is an insidious risk that needs to be dealt with. There is probably no best answer, just a better one.

Short of dying early, most of us will need advanced care of some kind. And like shopping for groceries or going out to eat at a restaurant, it ain’t gonna happen without a money source.

The sooner you come to terms with this, the more likely your future years will be less stressful.

Oct 9, 2017 By Greg Iacurci

Roughly half of Americans turning 65 today will require long-term care. As life expectancy continues to rise and the cost of care creeps up, there’s a growing need for financial advisers to be knowledgeable about long-term-care funding mechanisms to help clients choose the best one — or combination.

Long-term-care coverage is delivered primarily through “private” means. Roughly 55% of expenditures from age 65 through death are via these private forms of payment, with 2.7% of that from insurance and the remainder from out-of-pocket expenses, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

About 45% of long-term-care funding is from the “public” sector, mainly from Medicaid.

Public and private options have respective benefits and drawbacks concerning expense, level of long-term-care benefits and quality of care.

INSURANCE

Traditional LTC
There are a few insurance options to hedge long-term-care risk: traditional long-term-care insurance, and life insurance policies and annuities with long-term-care features.

In 2017, the national median cost for a private room in a nursing home is roughly $8,100 per month, according to an annual report published by the insurer Genworth. An assisted living facility costs $3,750 a month.

Traditional LTC insurance is a stand-alone policy devoted specifically to providing benefits for long-term care if a need arises. This insurance delivers LTC benefits at the lowest cost and offer inflation protection, observers said.

Sales of these policies have dwindled over the past several years. While insurers sold 700,000 of these policies in 2000, the American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance estimates the industry will close out this year with 75,000 policy sales.

There’s been negative consumer sentiment in the marketplace as insurers have had to raise premiums in recent years on in-force policies due to initial policy mispricing, following a misjudgment in lapse rates and interest rates, said Jesse Slome, executive director of AALTCI. A number of insurers also have abandoned the marketplace.

Advisers typically use traditional LTC insurance if clients have a tolerance for a potential premium increase in the future and if they don’t have a life-insurance need, said Phil Jackson, insurance planner at ValMark Financial Group.

Life insurance – LTC combination
Sales have shifted more to combined life insurance-LTC products. These products drew $3.6 billion in new premiums in 2016, a 500% increase over the $600 million in 2007, according to Limra, an insurance industry group.

Broadly, advisers like the flexibility of these policies. Mr. Jackson explains it in terms of “live, quit or die”: Clients get a long-term-care benefit while living, but can also surrender the policy for a portion of their premium or provide heirs with a death benefit. The latter options aren’t available for traditional policies.

Further, premiums and benefits are guaranteed, he said.

Combo policies come in two flavors: hybrid LTC, and life insurance with LTC riders. Hybrids provide more of a long-term-care benefit and have a “very small, very modest” death benefit, whereas policies with LTC riders are more life-insurance focused, Mr. Jackson said.

One key difference is hybrids typically have an inflation-protection feature allowing a client’s future LTC benefit to grow annually, whereas the benefits are fixed in policies with riders, Mr. Jackson said.

Among LTC-related sales year-to-date at ValMark, 45.9% have been hybrid, 49.5% LTC riders and 4.6% traditional LTC.

Annuities
Annuity products are the least-used among insurance products for providing LTC benefits. Combination annuity-LTC sales were $480 million last year, up from $285 million in 2011 but little-changed since 2014, according to Limra.

The products deliver a lifetime income stream, and increase that income in the event of a long-term-care need.

“Annuities are pretty much a last resort for long-term care,” said Jess Rorar, a planner at ValMark. Life insurance products provide more of a benefit and give more value for the money, she said.

However, in the event insurers decline a client from buying traditional LTC or combined life insurance-LTC, annuities can serve as a backup because the underwriting requirements are easier, said Jamie Hopkins, the Larry R. Pike Chair in Insurance and Investments at the American College of Financial Services.

MEDICAID

“Almost every adviser you talk to has clients that end up on Medicaid. It’s just the reality of aging and living a long time,” Mr. Hopkins said.

The government assesses income and asset levels when determining individual qualifications for Medicaid. Generally, individuals have to essentially run out of money before Medicaid kicks in, Mr. Hopkins said.

Clients often need the help of an elder-care attorney to structure their assets appropriately — for example, there are several exceptions for assets, such as a home, that get protected from a Medicaid spend-down calculation, and an attorney can help protect those to the largest extent possible, Mr. Hopkins said.

Medicaid facilities, though, often aren’t as nice as those provided by private care; so private insurance would likely better protect one’s quality of life, he said.

SELF-INSURANCE

Clients concerned about asset flexibility and freedom, as well as those with an aversion to medical underwriting, are often candidates for self-insuring if they have the appropriate wealth, Mr. Jackson said.

“Generally, even if you have the assets to self-fund, you’ll get a better return on your dollars if you use an insurance solution,” he said.

Clients also “tend to have to hold a lot of assets hostage to that self-insurance,” Mr. Hopkins said. “You’re not really allowed to touch them,” which sometimes leads to a reduction of lifestyle when young people set assets aside in a separate account for LTC purposes.

Medicare open enrollment begins Sunday – and not just for those age 65 and up…

My Comments: Have you noticed a flurry of ads on TV recently talking about Medicare and all the benefits you are entitled to for one easy price per month? I have.

The ads promote the use of Medicare Plan C, also known as Medicare Advantage plans. They are a sop to the insurance industry, giving companies a way to make more money by selling you stuff you may or may not need.

Years ago I decided those extras had little value to me and only lined the pockets of agents and companies at my expense. That’s not to say you might find value with them but as a financial professional, I refused to play the game.

Last year during the open enrollment period, I checked my coverage for Part D, the prescription drug coverage plan. I went to https://www.medicare.gov/, found the spot where you can compare alternatives, and entered the drugs I’m taking for a price analysis. The result was signing up for a different provider and it saved me $85 per month. Not bad.

That being said, if you are already on Medicare or your 65th birthday is around the corner, I encourage you to visit the official Medicare web site. It has good information. Go here: https://www.medicare.gov/

Normally when I write one of these posts it’s to share an article written by someone else. This time I’m simply going to give you two active links to follow if you think any of this is important to you.

Link #1: https://goo.gl/p8nRiF

Link #2: http://flip.it/fg6foM

Remember, there’s also a link just to the right on this page where you can schedule a conversation with me as you wrestle with all this…

How to choose a health insurance policy

My Comments: Having health insurance is critical to maintain your financial well being, much less your long term health. Health care costs in this country are the highest in the world, and the long term outcomes are among the worst.

The budget passed by the House of Representatives includes a significant cut to Medicare, if the media is correct. Why do we keep electing people to Congress who fail to understand their reason for being there in the first place?

Oh, I guess I forgot. They’re there to make money, and the drug companies, the insurance companies, the hospital industry make sure they are properly prioritized.

P.S. – there’s a short window open to get coverage under the ACA. There’s also a short window open to buy a better Medicare Plan D (subscription drug coverage).

Wendy Connick, The Motley Fool Sept. 29, 2017

Given the high cost of major medical treatments, health insurance is a must for just about everyone. But health insurance policies vary wildly in cost, coverage, and other features, so it’s important to choose your plan with your individual needs, resources, and medical history in mind.

Identify your source

If you’re fortunate enough to have employer-provided health insurance, that narrows your options down to the plans that your employer offers. If you don’t have coverage through your job, perhaps an organization or association that you belong to will allow you to buy health insurance through them at a group rate.

Another option is to check your local Obamacare health insurance marketplace to see if you qualify for an upfront premium credit, which would get you reduced premium costs. Even if you don’t qualify for the credit right away, buying your health insurance through the marketplace means you may qualify for it when you file your tax return for the year.

If you can’t, or won’t, get health insurance from any of these sources, you’ll have to fall back on buying a private plan. It will give you the widest range of options, but likely will be far more expensive.

Decide which type of policy to buy

Health insurance policies come in a variety of basic types, although you may not have access to all of these options through your preferred source. Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) are a very common type of health insurance policy. With an HMO, you’re required to use healthcare providers within the policy’s network, and you have to get a referral from your primary care physician in order to see a specialist.

Preferred Provider Organizations (PPOs) are also quite common. A PPO health insurance policy has a network, but you’re not limited to in-network care — although using network providers is cheaper — and you don’t need referrals to see specialists.

Exclusive Provider Organizations (EPOs) are a hybrid between HMOs and PPOs. You’re required to stick to the plan’s network, but don’t need referrals for specialists. Finally, Point of Service (POS) plans are a less common option that are essentially the opposite of an EPO. You’re not limited to the POS plan’s network, but do need a referral to see a specialist.

Of the four common types of plans, an HMO or EPO tends to be cheaper than a PPO or POS with the same level of coverage. However, if network coverage is poor in your area, or you’re uncomfortable limiting yourself to network providers, it may be worth paying a little more to get a PPO or POS policy.

High deductible versus low deductible

All things being equal, the higher a plan’s deductible is, the lower the monthly premiums will be. A high deductible means that you’ll have to pay a lot of healthcare expenses yourself before the insurance policy kicks in, but if you have few or no medical expenses in a given year, these plans can be a bargain. Very low medical expenses means that you probably won’t surpass the deductible, even of a low-deductible plan, so getting a high-deductible plan keeps your insurance costs as low as possible while still protecting you in case something catastrophic happens.

If you decide to go the high-deductible route, getting a Health Savings Account (HSA)-enabled plan, and funding it with at least the equivalent of a year’s deductible, is your best option. An HSA plan neatly covers the biggest weakness of a high-deductible health insurance policy — namely, that you’d have to shell out a great deal of money on a major medical expense before the insurance would take over. If you have a full-year’s deductible tucked away in your HSA, you can just use that money to finance your share of the expenses, while simultaneously enjoying the triple tax advantage that an HSA offers.

Comparing coverage

There are two major factors that affect how well a particular plan will cover your medical expenses: the plan’s network and its coverage policies. Even if you choose a plan with out-of-network options, like a PPO, you’re still better off using in-network health providers as much as possible because doing so will reduce your costs. And the rules that a given health insurance policy uses to decide what’s covered and what’s not — and how much the co-pays will be — can make a huge difference in how helpful a particular policy really is for you.

For example, if there’s a rather pricey medication that you take every day, you’ll definitely want to get a health insurance policy that lists that medication on its formulary. If you travel a lot, stick to plans that offer good out-of-area treatment options. And if you already have a primary care physician, you’ll definitely want to pick a plan that includes your doctor in its network.

Finding the best deal

If you’re stuck between two or three different policies and can’t decide which one to choose, try this exercise. Multiply the monthly premium by 12 to get your annual cost for a plan, then add in the plan’s out-of-pocket maximum. The result is the most you would end up spending on health care if you had one or more major medical expenses during the year. Do this calculation for each plan you’re considering, then compare the results. The plan with the lowest total is likely the best deal for you.

Why Sign Up for Medicare If I Have Insurance Already?

My Comments: I’m increasingly asked about signing up for Medicare at 65 or not. This happens as more and more of us are still working at age 65 and expect to keep working for several years to come. This article by Matthew Frankel will give you the background necessary to help your decision.

by Matthew Frankel \ Jul 16, 2017

The standard eligibility age for Medicare in the United States is 65. However, many people don’t know if they need to sign up for Medicare if they already have other health insurance coverage, such as through a job, a spouse’s employer, from their former employer, or through COBRA. Here’s a quick guide that can help you determine if you need to sign up for Medicare when you turn 65 or if you can wait longer without paying a penalty.

How Medicare works with your other insurance

When you have more than one insurance provider, there are certain rules that determine who pays what it owes first and who pays based on the remaining balance. For seniors who don’t have other insurance, Medicare is obviously the primary payer. However, when you have other insurance, it’s a little more complicated.

Depending on the type of insurance you have (group coverage, retiree coverage, COBRA, marketplace coverage, etc.), Medicare can either be the primary or the secondary payer. If Medicare would be a secondary payer to your current insurance, you can delay signing up for Medicare Part B. If your current insurance would become a secondary payer to Medicare, you should sign up during your initial enrollment period, which is the seven-month period that begins three months prior to the month you’ll turn 65.

It’s also worth noting that although I’m specifically mentioning Medicare Part B, which is medical insurance, this applies to Part A (hospital insurance) as well. However, Medicare Part A is free to the vast majority of Americans, so it’s probably worth signing up for Part A whether you’re required to or not. On the other hand, Medicare Part B has a monthly premium you’ll have to pay, which is why it can make sense to delay signing up if it’s not going to be your primary insurance.

Who can delay signing up for Medicare?

So, whose insurance remains the primary payer? In a nutshell, if you have coverage through your or your spouse’s current employment, and the employer has 20 or more employees, your insurance plan remains the primary payer.

If you aren’t sure if your employer meets the “group health coverage” criteria, ask your employer’s benefits manager.

If you do qualify, you can delay signing up for Medicare for as long as you (or your spouse) are still working. Once the employment or your employer-based health coverage ends, you’ll have eight months to sign up for Medicare Part B without paying a penalty, which is a permanently higher premium.

It’s also important to note that regardless of whether you’re still working or not, if you’ve already signed up for Social Security benefits, you’ll be automatically enrolled in Medicare Parts A and B when you turn 65. If you don’t want to keep Part B, you’ll need to cancel it (instructions are on the Medicare card you’ll receive).

Who should sign up at 65, even if they have other insurance?

This leaves a fairly long list of other types of insurance that become secondary payers to Medicare. Therefore, if you’re turning 65 and any of these situations apply to you, you should sign up for Medicare during your initial enrollment period.

• You have group coverage through your or your spouse’s employer, but the employer has fewer than 20 workers.

• You have retiree coverage, either through your former employer or your spouse’s former employer.

• You have group coverage through COBRA.

• You have TRICARE, the healthcare program for military service members, retirees, and their families. Retired service members must get Medicare Part B when eligible in order to keep their TRICARE coverage. (Note: If you’re still on active duty, you don’t have to enroll in Medicare until after you retire.)

• You have veterans’ benefits.

• You have coverage through the healthcare marketplace or have other private insurance. Once your Medicare coverage begins, you’ll no longer get any reduced premium or tax credit for marketplace coverage, and you should drop this coverage as you’ll no longer need it (unless you’re not eligible for premium-free Part A, which is not common).

If one of these situations applies to you and you don’t sign up for Medicare Part B during your initial enrollment period, you could face permanently higher premiums when you do.

GOP confronts an inconvenient truth: Americans want a healthcare safety net

My Comments: Some of my friends continue to decry the notion of socialism. They seem to equate it with communism, a very different animal. It’s too bad they haven’t yet figured out that it’s not a rejection of capitalism. For me, because the word has accumulated so many negatives, not unlike the Confederate flag, I’ve searched for an alternative.

I’m a profound believer in capitalism. But I’m smart enough to know that unfettered capitalism becomes an attack on society, where the have’s get to enslave the have nots.

There are hundreds of millions of people on this planet who benefit from social order, whether it’s rules that tell us which side of the street to drive on, or taxing the population to provide national parks. Where along the lengthy path of human development over time would anti-socialist have us return in their efforts to reject the benefits of social order? And does anyone have a suggestion for what to call it?

by Noam N. Levey – July 28, 2017 – Los Angeles Times

The dramatic collapse of Senate legislation to repeal the Affordable Care Act may not end the Republican dream of rolling back the 2010 healthcare law.

But it lay bare a reality that will impede any GOP effort to sustain the repeal campaign: Americans, though ambivalent about Obamacare in general, don’t want to give up the law’s landmark health protections.

“There may be a whole lot of Americans who are complaining about government, but that doesn’t mean they agree with eliminating the safety net,” said former Sen. Dave Durenberger, a Minnesota Republican and healthcare policy leader in the 1980s and ’90s. “We saw that with Social Security and Medicare in Reagan’s day. Now it is a much broader group of people who rely on those health protections.”

And as the Senate debate this week illustrated, Obamacare’s safety net — both guaranteed insurance for the sick and expanded Medicaid coverage for the poor — proved too valued to tear apart.

That means that, while attacks on Obamacare will probably continue, it’s increasingly unlikely that President Trump or GOP congressional leaders will be able to rip out the law “root and branch,” as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) once promised.

The GOP’s failure to dismantle the expanded healthcare safety net also may provide an opening for Republicans and Democrats to cooperate on measures to help Americans who have struggled in recent years with rising premiums brought about, in part, by Obamacare.

“Now the real work lies before us,” March of Dimes President Stacey D. Stewart said Friday, following the defection overnight of three GOP senators who voted against a last-ditch Republican bill to begin unraveling the law.

“Our healthcare system and the laws that govern it are far from perfect, and many opportunities exist to find areas of common ground to make improvements,” Stewart said

The March of Dimes is among scores of patient advocacy organizations, hospitals, physicians’ groups and others who bitterly fought the GOP repeal push, warning of disastrous consequences for tens of millions of sick and vulnerable Americans.

This was not how Republicans had sketched out repeal.

For years, GOP politicians cast themselves as saviors, promising to deliver Americans from a law that former Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson, now Trump’s Housing secretary, once called the “worst thing that has happened in this nation since slavery.”

Demonizing Obamacare, initially a derisive label the GOP coined for the ACA, proved good politics. Republicans scored major victories in the 2010, 2014 and 2016 elections on pledges to roll back the law.

But the successful political message — which built off deep partisan divisions — obscured much broader support for the law’s core elements.

For example, 80% of Americans in a national survey last fall reported favorable views of allowing states to expand Medicaid to cover more poor adults, and of providing aid to low- and moderate-income Americans to help them buy health coverage, two pillars of the law.

The same proportion, according to the poll by the nonprofit Kaiser Family Foundation, liked the law’s insurance marketplaces, which allow consumers to shop among health plans that must offer a basic set of benefits.

Nearly 70% backed the law’s coverage guarantee, which prohibits insurers from turning away people due to their medical history of preexisting conditions.

“As a law, Obamacare got caught up in the politics of the time. It became the symbol of the Obama administration,” said Mollyann Brodie, who oversees polling for the Kaiser Family Foundation. “But the policies themselves have always been quite popular, even among Republicans.”

GOP politicians didn’t have to reckon with that contradiction as they took dozens of essentially meaningless repeal votes while Obama was still in the White House to veto their bills.

That changed after the 2016 elections. No longer was repeal an abstract political slogan.

It was a concrete set of plans that cut insurance subsidies for millions of Americans, slashed hundreds of billions of dollars in federal Medicaid assistance to states and weakened coverage guarantees by allowing insurers to once again charge sick people more for coverage.

That is not what Americans wanted, said Dr. Jack Ende, president of the American College of Physicians.

“No version of legislation brought up this year would have achieved the types of reforms that Americans truly need: lower premiums and deductibles, with increased access to care,” said Ende, a University of Pennsylvania primary care doctor.

Independent analyses of the GOP repeal bills by the Congressional Budget Office and others estimated they would leave tens of millions more Americans without health coverage and drive up costs for many older and sicker consumers.

In the crosshairs were not just unemployed adults whom conservative critics derided as freeloaders, but also poor children, disabled Americans and seniors who worked all their lives but depended on Medicaid for nursing home care.

Altogether, nearly 1 in 4 Americans rely on Medicaid and the related Children’s Health Insurance Program for coverage.

And as the repeal debate dragged on in Washington and in congressional districts across the country, stories of these Americans and others who rely on Obamacare’s healthcare protections brought the safety net to life.

National polls ultimately showed that fewer than 1 in 5 Americans surveyed supported the Republican repeal legislation.

By contrast, 60% of Americans in a recent Pew Research Center poll said that it is the federal government’s responsibility to ensure all Americans have health coverage — the highest level in nearly a decade.

Even many Republican state leaders — including the governors of Ohio, Nevada and Arizona — balked at the congressional rush to roll back the Medicaid safety net. In a bipartisan letter to Senate leaders this week, several of these governors urged lawmakers to turn away from the repeal push.

“We ask senators to work with governors on solutions to problems we can all agree on: fixing our unstable insurance markets,” wrote the governors — five Republicans and five Democrats.

Some congressional Republicans seemed reluctant to give up the repeal campaign. “As long as there is breath in my body, I will be fighting for the working men and women of this country that are being hurt by Obamacare,” Texas Sen. Ted Cruz said after the vote early Friday morning.

And conservative activists continue to demand action. “In Washington, there are no permanent victories or permanent defeats,” said Heritage Foundation President Edwin J. Feulner.

The president, meanwhile, reiterated his threats to “let Obamacare implode,” as he said in a Twitter post after the early Friday vote.

The administration could potentially sabotage insurance markets across the country by refusing to enforce the current law’s requirement to buy insurance or withholding payments to health insurers that subsidize costs for very low-income consumers.

But at the Capitol, Democrats and some Republicans appear willing to begin considering legislation to protect those markets and help millions of American consumers who have seen insurance premiums rise dramatically in recent years.

“Simply letting Obamacare collapse will only cause even more pain,” warned Rep. Kevin Brady (R-Texas), chairman of the powerful House Ways and Means Committee.

Fixing the safety net represents a far better approach than a new push to tear it down, said Durenberger, the former GOP senator.

“Bipartisanship is the only option,” he said.